How to say Hello

By Paul G on March 26, 2011
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Below are a few ways to say hello in several tribal languages.

O’-Si-Yo’
Cherokee

Halito
Choctaw

Hau
Dakota and Lakota Sioux

Buzhu
Objiwa Chippewa

Apaa
Yupik Eskimo

Ya’at’eeh
Dene Navajo

 

Source: The Indian Way CD by Mark Thiel

Purchase the Indian Way CD from Noc Bay

TOPICS: Native American Culture

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6 Responses to “How to say Hello”

  1. Theresa says:

    I am interested in learning all I can.. My heart desires the native ways..

  2. Charlie Smith says:

    Greetings,

    Large public school district in Elizabeth, New Jersey.
    Would like to have native american performers (dancers/singers) for an event on October 25, 2012 in Elizabeth, New Jersey.

    Please advise,

    Charlie Smith
    Elizabeth Public Schools
    (908) 436 – 5040

  3. Edward Hammond says:

    My mother and grand mother, her cousins,my aunts and uncles used to say buzhu to say hello in the ottawa language, here in the last twenty years or so, I learned another way, they say aanii.

  4. Elizabeth Warren says:

    How!

    Thank you my great new and even friendly natives. I love you guys so much, vote for me–twice if you can!

    No hard feelings, right? After all, it was just a little white lie–one of those would never hurt anyone!

    Elizabeth Warren

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