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CDIB Meaning vs. DNA vs. Enrollment | CDIB Card Info | Native American

CDIB Meaning vs. DNA vs. Enrollment | CDIB Card Info | Native American

Posted By Paul G May 3rd, 2017 Last Updated on: December 11th, 2019

You may think you have Native American heritage, but there is a lot more to it than simply the stories about a distant ancestor that have been passed down through your family members.

The tribal enrollment process is a long journey.

And when it comes to researching your genealogy, you’ll likely stumble upon a lot of unfamiliar terms that may cause some confusion your research process.

Thankfully, you have access to more information than ever before through the resources available online. Here, we will discuss the key differences between DNA test results, a CDIB card, and Tribal Enrollment.

The Purpose of DNA Test Results in Your Family History Search 

DNA test results are not enough on their own to qualify someone as belonging to a specific tribe. However, a DNA test is a good place to start to see if attempting to enroll in a tribe is worthwhile for you.

Each different American Indian tribe has their own set of specific eligibility requirements for tribal enrollment. You cannot simply state that you are descendent of such-and-such, who was a member of that tribe. You will often have to prove that your ancestor was indeed a member of that tribe, and you will also have to prove your relation to that ancestor.

This is where a DNA test comes in: it can help you establish a firm connection to someone in the tribe. There are several DNA testing services available online, such as 23andMe, FamilyTreeDNA, and Ancestry.com. But remember, DNA testing and confirming your relation to a tribe member is not enough to claim your belonging in a tribe, as you will have to meet the tribe’s other specific eligibility requirements.

Related InfoWhat You Should Know About DNA Testing for Family History Research

Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood (CDIB)

CDIB cards are issued by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). It lists an individual’s blood degree by tribe and contains information about their birth date and the last four digits of their social security number. CDIB cards are signed by a BIA representative.

However, the BIA does not oversee the tribal enrollment process for any individual tribe. Therefore, obtaining a CDIB card does not necessarily mean that a person is an established member of a federally recognized tribe. Since tribes take care of their own membership process, you will have to go through their specific tribal enrollment in order to become a recognized member.

The Tribal Enrollment Process

As we’ve discussed previously, each tribe has their own specific criteria when it comes to tribal membership eligibility. Tribes are sovereign nations, so there is no involvement from the federal government or any U.S. government agency when it comes to tribal enrollment. A tribe will typically list their enrollment criteria in their constitution, ordinances, or articles of incorporation.

While tribal membership criteria vary between tribes, there are a few common requirements in most. One is proof that you descend from someone listed one the tribe’s base roll, which is an original list of members. Another is tribal blood quantum.




These two things can be proven through DNA testing and obtaining a CDIB card, but they are not enough to grant enrollment in a particular tribe. Other enrollment criteria can include continued contact with the tribe in question or a tribal residency.

Essentially, you cannot apply to enroll as a member of a tribe until after you have completed your genealogical research. Then, you will have to speak directly with the tribe you want to enroll with about their specific process. There are 562 total American Indian and Alaska Native tribes that are federally recognized, and you can find them in the BIA Tribal Leaders Directory.


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Lee Lockwood

my children know their Indian grandma , aunts and uncles and dad and still can’t get enroll with their tribe.

Allan

Ok maybe someone can answer my question. My daughter was digging on ancestry and found records of the National Archives where there is an enrollment card for the Five Civilized Tribes, 1896-1916 with my grandmothers name on my fathers side. Then another record that says Of the Creek and Seminole Tribes census saying age 1 and female with census card number 580.
So what does this actually mean? The kicker is I am 62 and just now finding this out, and I have nothing but cousins alive on my dads side to question. Oh, I do plan on having a dna test done. Which is best to use?

Sharon

I know a man in South Central Texas, he said he was half Comanche and half Irish. The next year he decided he was 1/4 Comanche and 1/4 Irish – I asked what the 1/2 left was – no answer.

Joann Alvarez

My DNA shows I am 36 percent Native American . How do I find out what tribe I am from.

Rose M Luera

My DNA shows I’m 66% Native American

Kimberly Britt

Can you send me info where to get dna tests and enrollment for cherokee tribe .iam comanche father’s side and cherokee mother’s side.

jerry sloan

I have family names on the daws final rolls does that mean I can apply for a cbid card and to be able to become a citizen to that tribe

[…] Related Info – DNA Results vs. Tribal Enrollment vs. CDIB — What Do They All Mean? […]

MA

What is the best DNA test to take to determine my Native American percentage. What company?

Melissa Ferrell

My mother is Cheyenne Indian from what she has told me all of my life my father is isish my mother told me to go to a powwow LONG LONG TIME AGO. SHES PASSED NOW GOD REST HER SOUL. BUT I WANT TO BE A PART IN. ANYWAY PISSIBLE THAT I MAPY BE ABLE TO BE I COME FROM A VERY POOR FAMILY I STILL HAVE VERY HARD TIMES SURVIVN THESE DAYS MY SELF. SO COULD SOME ONE ANYONE PLEASE DIRECT ME OR HELP ME I WANT TO BE AS CLOSE TO HER AS I POSSIBLY CAN UNTIL I SEE HER IN HEAVEN. THANK YOU SO MUCH N GOD BLESS MY NUMBER TO REACH ME IS 8503176455 MY NAME IS MELISSA FERELL I RESIDE IN WESTVILLE FLORIDA

Tanya Jeter

My DNA says I am 51% Native American how do I start my search into what tribe I am a descendant from?

Robert k Strawn

I was just told by Ancestry Ancestry paper work I was only 30% but if you ever saw my pictures you’ll see way more then 30% and my skin is brown color but not dark until I get out under the sun and people stops me asking if I’m a native American and also say to me that I was the first Native American theyve ever seen and people at the pow wows stopping and asking me questions about Indians but all I can do is tell them I was adopted when I was 11 months old and nobody won’t tell me my real mother’s name.

Robert k Strawn

Also I was adopted March 1963 when I was 11 months old and I do not know what my name is or was before the parents that Adopted me and gave me the name that I’ve always gone by. Also since nobody knows or knew the hospital I was born at I’m not really sure if I was really born in Miami Florida. All I was told by the mother that adopted me that my Real Parents took me to the adoption home where they adopted me from back when I was three years old and I had my Adoption Papers until they was stolen March 8 2008 and even on those paper work it doesn’t and didn’t have or show what my Real Name was before I was Adopted March 1963 and was given the name I’ve only known.

Ralph Sanchez

Can you apply for a CDIB card after you get your DNA results, and what BIA would I seek? I’m in California and I’m pretty sure my bloods from Arizona ,WhiteMoutian area,thanks for any reply,

Bob

I’ve various admixtures, African, European,Asian, but the Americas are the only admixture with Ancestry. Are the Americas my root?

Jeannie Oliver

. you should pray the higher spirit beyond our vision got you just believe Hare Krishna

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