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‘Beyond 140’ with Indigenous Artist Gregg Deal

Posted By Toyacoyah Brown May 12th, 2014 Last Updated on: May 12th, 2014

Al Jazeera's The Stream (Beyond 140) recently caught up with artist Gregg Deal as he was finishing up his mural piece which draws attention to the Change the Mascot issue.

Photo by Dakota Fine via Gregg Deal Facebook Page

Photo by Dakota Fine via Gregg Deal Facebook Page

Photo by Dakota Fine via Gregg Deal Facebook Page

Photo by Dakota Fine via Gregg Deal Facebook Page

What compelled you to make the mural? What did you want to achieve through it?

My desire was to say something that hasn't been said, including a perspective not brought to the table. Everyone wants to make this an 80-year issue, but it's not. It's a 522-year issue. The issues that are being talked about with the football issue actually span back to 1492. So to put into perspective an American Genocide, something any indigenous person would tell you is a real thing, and juxtaposing that with the ridiculous notion of ‘honor' or ‘reconciliation' through racial slurs and gross misrepresentation of indigenous people through caricatures seemed the right thing to do.

Photo by Dakota Fine via Gregg Deal Facebook Page

Photo by Dakota Fine via Gregg Deal Facebook Page

You might also recognize Deal from his performance piece The Last American Indian On Earth. He takes the stereotypical American Indian image and places it into modern everyday situations, like grocery shopping or getting a coffee at Starbucks.

Watch a trailer of the film here:

The Last American Indian On Earth – Trailer 1 from Gregg Deal on Vimeo.

If you like what you see, you can follow Gregg Deal on Facebook or Twitter.


Home » Native American Articles » Native American Culture » ‘Beyond 140' with Indigenous Artist Gregg Deal

About Toyacoyah Brown

Toyacoyah Brown is an enrolled member of the Comanche Nation, currently living in Chicago. She received her B.A. in Journalism from the University of Oklahoma and an M.A. in Media Studies from the University of Texas at Austin. When she's not scouring the Internet for fun things to share with PowWows.com readers you can find her digging for vinyl in her local record store or curling up with a good book.



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loucyoung

Well this art is awesome and it is nice to see the American Indian do take pride in the ancestors before them.and the respect they have for elders.

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