fbpx

Native Entrepreneur Partners With Sephora – Jenn Harper – Founder Of Cheekbone Beauty

Posted By Paul G February 16th, 2022 Last Updated on: March 2nd, 2022

Paul G recently interviewed Cheekbone Beauty founder Jenn Harper on the Pow Wow Life podcast.  Jenn shared her story of a Native entrepreneur and even gave you a special discount code for 15% off.  See below for more details!

Cheekbone Beauty is an Indigenous-owned and founded, digitally-native, Canadian cosmetics company established in 2016. Based out of St. Catharines, Ontario, Cheekbone Beauty is known for creating high quality, cruelty-free beauty products including our signature SUSTAIN line of lipsticks and eye pencils, our Warrior Women liquid lipsticks, and a variety of other cosmetics all designed for low environmental impact and maximum wearability.


Save 15% Off Cheeckbone Beauty

Code – powwows.com

Shop Now


An award-winning social entrepreneur, Jenn Harper is the founder and CEO of Cheekbone Beauty Cosmetics INC.  Cheekbone Beauty is a digitally native direct to consumer brand that is helping Indigenous youth see themselves in a beauty brand while using the concept of Life Cycle Thinking (LCT) in the brands ethos and in developing products.  Creating a new segment in the beauty industry – Sustainable Socially Conscious Beauty. 

Jennifer Harper has been making a name for herself in the beauty industry for a number of years but has been gaining popularity quickly after being on the hit CBC show, Dragons Den https://www.cbc.ca/dragonsden/m_pitches/cheekbone-beauty in 2019. Cheekbone Beauty’s mission is to help every Indigenous youth see and feel their enormous value in the world while creating sustainable cosmetics.

Cheekbone Beauty is committed to donating 2% of revenues to organizations that support Indigenous youth. During Cheekbone Beauty’s infancy, Jenn endured a heavy personal loss with the suicide of her brother B.J. This loss, though difficult, has remained a driving force behind the desire to see Cheekbone Beauty succeed with its mission, to empower Indigenous youth.

In addition to Cheekbone’s mission, she strives to educate as many people as possible about the Residential School System and the effects it has had on my family and friends through decades of generational trauma. She speaks regularly to university, college and high school students about social entrepreneurship, empathy and the history of her First Nations family. She has also been invited to speak to various entrepreneur groups, women in business associations, Apple Canada and First Nations organizations.

In 2019, Jenn was named ‘Women of the Year’ by Chatelaine Magazine.  https://www.chatelaine.com/living/jennifer-harper-woman-of-the-year-2019/

 

 

Transcript

Paul Gowder:

Today I interview Jenn Harper, a native entrepreneur that founded Cheekbone Beauty, a thriving and leading beauty product line that not only is run by indigenous people, but has products made for indigenous women.

Paul Gowder:

Welcome back to Pow Wow Life, the podcast from PowWows.com. I'm your host Paul Gowder, thank you again for being a part of our community. PowWows.com is your place to explore all parts of native American culture. Whether it's finding Pow Wows near you, learning more about the dance styles, watching our videos, listening to our podcasts, or just joining the community and talking to others. PowWows.com is your place to connect and experience native culture. So thanks for being a part of our community.

Paul Gowder:

To get all the latest information we have going on at PowWows.com, make sure you subscribe to our newsletter over at www.PowWows.com/newsletter. We'll send you updates on all the new listings on the calendar, because Pow Wows is all back. We've got over a 1000 listings each year, so we can find one near you. We'll send those out twice a month, as well as other announcements and specials in our newsletter. So don't miss what's going on with PowWows.com. And we're going to be streaming Pow Wows again this year and we'll announce those in the newsletter as well.

Paul Gowder:

This month, we're also giving away 10 Pendleton blankets and you can enter to win those over at www.PowWows.com/win. At the end of today's show, I'll give you a bonus code only for you listeners to the podcast. And I've got another goodie for you. Cheekbone Beauty has created a coupon code to save you 15% off your orders over at www.cheekbonebeauty.com. Just enter the code PowWows.com that easy and get 15% off.

Paul Gowder:

All right, so now let's get to the interview with Jenn Harper, the founder of Cheekbone Beauty and her amazing story of how she's built this business. Today we've got Jenn Harper from Cheekbone Beauty, and this brand I've seen them for years and love their stuff, it's amazing. But so my first question is, the beauty space is so crowded and there's so many big brands in this. How did you guys even have the idea to jump into this space?

Jenn Harper:

Yeah, so really crazy story how I ended up here, definitely no experience in the beauty industry. I was actually selling seafood at the time. I was a sales rep for a seafood company and always a beauty lover, product junkie for sure. Loved hanging out in any of those beauty shops, touching and playing with products. But I had a crazy dream, I always laugh when I say that, it was a literal little pop out of bed, middle of the night dream.

Jenn Harper:

The backstory is, I struggled with actually alcoholism for many years. I got sober November 26th, 2014. And in January of 2015, I have this dream, native little girls covered in lip gloss. But what I remember the most was about the dream they're rosy little cheeks and the joy and laughter from these little girls. And so grabbed my laptop that night. And it was clear as day to me, the business that I was going to start writing about. And the whole process was just literally thinking about, “Okay, I'm going to now figure out how to make a lip gloss.” And at the same time I was learning about my grandmother's experience at residential or boarding school.

Jenn Harper:

And so I had no idea that that was my family's history, no one ever talked about it. And as I was learning that over those same years on a new sobriety journey and then having that dream, it just was all of these layers, multiple layers folding into one another. And it really turned out to be for the first couple of years, just such an incredible healing journey because it helped me understand who I was and where I came from. And it helped me understand my family's experience and a term that I never heard before for in my life, which was called generational or transgenerational trauma.

Jenn Harper:

And so that experience of the residential boarding school for my grandparents caused trauma within our family. It was passed on to my father, my aunties, my uncles, and then ultimately passed on to me and my siblings. And alcoholism being a symptom of that because it was a bandaid solution to deal with much deeper issues. But years of therapy helped me discover all of those things, but it was just a crazy pivotal moment for sure, the dream.

Jenn Harper:

I end up in the space and I discovered, again, like you just mentioned, so competitive, I sometimes would say to people, I'm like, “Why couldn't I have dreamt about pencils or something else or a category that was not this competitive?” It is bananas saturated., The world did not need another lipstick brand at all. But what it did need was a brand that was represented and representing indigenous faces and indigenous people. And that's something that did not exist in the mainstream or could ever be found in broad line major retailers. And so that was the vision that I had for the brand.

Jenn Harper:

And then the more I started learning about the actual industry and the beauty space, there was so much need for change. We're living in a time of climate crisis. And the beauty industry happens to be really unsustainable, a lot of plastic packaging, a lot of waste, even the raw ingredients, which are those ingredients that go into your lipsticks blushes, mascara's, being unsustainable, meaning they don't biodegrade. So when you were saying, washing your face off and your makeup's going down the drain or your cleansers and skin hair, those ingredients are not compatible with ecosystems and waterways.

Jenn Harper:

And so the more I learned about all of those really, really important and scientific things, discovering that products could be made better and there is a more sustainable way. One to make raw ingredients and packaging. I began a journey of creating a brand that was really focused in on that idea. And it was really interesting because the more I learned about my culture, my Anishinaabe roots, it's how our people have lived for thousands of years. I've literally called indigenous people the OGs of sustainability.

Jenn Harper:

When I look up and did some research, which is our language, there's not even a word for sustainability it's because when we say things like doing things in a good way, that's just how we do things. And then there's so many teachings as you dig deeper and find out, just the idea of the seven generation teaching, thinking like what we do today will impact the next seven generations. And unfortunately, when we live in a Western society and people are more fo focused on profits than the planet, those things get lost. And so as a brand, we really look at making and creating products very holistically. And despite being an actual consumer goods company, how can we do and make things better? And so we find ourselves here today on that sustainability path. But at first and foremost, was that foundation, how can we just bring native faces to the beauty industry? That's how we started.

Paul Gowder:

Yeah. The that's a big mission. That's a lot of stuff to accomplish. And so you said you were a seafood salesperson. Yeah. So what is your background? Where are you from originally?

Jenn Harper:

So I'm from Southern Ontario, Canada, my family's reservation or the community that I'm a registered member of is called Northwest Angle 33. So it's almost at the border of Minnesota and Ontario, Manitoba in Canada, but I actually live and operate the company now in the Niagara region, which is Niagara Falls, that area. So I know if I say Niagara Falls, everyone's going to know where that is.

Paul Gowder:

Yes. Okay. Wow. I'm just amazed with the story of taking on such a challenge. We talked before we hit record that you had a few years there of doing it, like a lot of people, bootstrapping this. So when you got started, could you ever see it going this way? And what was your path here? Did you have a business background? What was your plan of growing the business?

Jenn Harper:

Yeah, that is such a great question. So I have always worked for other people. I never saw myself as an entrepreneur. I probably didn't even really know what that meant, but what I did have is I definitely am a go big or go home kind of person. And so after that dream, it just became so clear to me that a brand like this needed to exist. So definitely all passion gut and just this belief that I really strongly felt that this was such a missing piece in the beauty industry.

Jenn Harper:

And my career experience up to that point was the first 10 years of my career I was in the hospitality industry. So really about creating unique experiences for guests at boutique style hotels in the Niagara region here, which is the wine region. So I feel like that's really played a big role into the kind of brand we created, we really want our customers to have a wonderful experience when it starts online to the time they get their package. And now for us, with our Sephora relationship, what that future in-store experience with them will feel like. And that's really helped in creating a business and a brand.

Jenn Harper:

And I felt like I got to be a really creative person in that role. And then I moved into sales and marketing in the food industry still. And then we talk about the seafood industries where I spent the last eight years prior to Cheekbone Beauty. I was really focused on working in the sustainably seafood world. And so I learned a ton about what we're doing and how it's impacting our oceans. And so all of those things really played a big role into me building the kind of business I wanted to build and the kind of beauty brand I wanted to build and felt was necessary to help the beauty industry and to show people I think there's new and better ways to do things.

Jenn Harper:

Because sometimes when you are in an industry, I feel like you are doing things sort of as they've always been done. And it's harder to see things that there could be possibly a new way. So I think that's with a unique view and then also coming in with this indigenous view or worldview versus a more Western view, which is really an opposition to a lot of how business operates, really brought a unique layer to it.

Jenn Harper:

And then having the experience of being in sales, I faced rejection constantly. And so as an entrepreneur, I was really used to that. And so definitely had some thick skin, so got to hear a lot of nos early on. And then in building my relationship with Sephora, that not easy, it took years and years and years for us to get where we are and that relationship is still growing.

Jenn Harper:

So it's just about, I think the consistency and thankfully I had two prior roles in my past career that really helped me and built me to create the business. But then when I talk about passion, I said this before, I tragically lost my brother B.J to suicide in 2016, just before launching the brand. And he and I had spent so much time together talking about the business. He couldn't believe that his sister was doing something like this and that it was really this idea of we're creating these products.

Jenn Harper:

But we did have this idea of a give back always within the brand, that was built in the foundation. When someone purchases a product from our website, there's always going to be a portion of those profits or a portion of the revenues that are going to a cause that's going to support indigenous youth in some way. That was always the vision. And he thought that was just the coolest thing. And he said something to me really early on. And he said that, “Jenn, I think Cheekbone Beauty is going to be great. Our kids need help and they need hope.” And so on those days when I felt like this was such a struggle and I didn't feel like Cheekbone Beauty was going to make it. When you lose someone the way I lost my brother, it's insane how it's like that painful situation has really been the driving force behind the brand. And I know that he would be really proud to see where we are today.

Paul Gowder:

That's great. A big motivation there. And I can see how you can draw upon that. And you mentioned your dream about seeing young native girls. So as you started to grow, what has been reaction in the native communities? Have you heard back, have you reached the dream, have you gotten to see the young girls doing that?

Jenn Harper:

Yeah. From the beginning, the emails and messages we've received have been phenomenal, from kids themselves, to parents, to teachers, to just community members. The idea of representation has been huge. So up in Canada, we actually just finished… I don't think any native brand has ever had this kind of marketing campaign, but we won a million dollars Ad Spend from Bell Media, which is Canada's largest media conglomerate. And so just in the past November, December, we were on national TV commercials for two months with our beautiful campaign, I'm going to send you the link so you can watch the commercial we made, it's really, really powerful.

Jenn Harper:

We shot it up in the Yukon with a first nation community there. So we're all almost literally 99% indigenous cast, crew, all the vendors. I was really proud to find out that the caterer for the food in the Yukon for the two days shoot, a caterer that's indigenous owned, operated, native owned, operated were really struggling to survive. And the payment that they received for those two days kept their business afloat, they said for the next six months.

Paul Gowder:

Wow.

Jenn Harper:

Just feeding the casting crew, that's economic… That's just such fuel for so many things. And so the campaign happened, we did this shoot and then, so we've all seen it on national TV for the last two months, as well as billboards. So imagine going Toronto and Vancouver, our major cities, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Montreal, Victoria, getting messages, Calgary from all of these people across the country, sending his pictures of them driving down highways, like hopefully nobody's killing themselves. This is happening while they're driving. Because I was on the Gardiner Expressway in Toronto here taking pictures of the billboards, because I've never seen that in my life.

Jenn Harper:

And I was telling a story to one of our investors this morning that I used to go on that highway. It's called the Gardiner Expressway, to go visit my dad, my mom lived here in the Niagara region and when they separated, when I was younger and he lived in native public housing in Toronto and I would get to go visit him every other week or so. And that would be my route, down the Greyhound bus, down the highway. And I would look at those billboards as a little girl, but never did I actually sit there and see anyone that looked like me or imagine I would ever have a business that would have a brand on one of these massive billboards. And so it was really emotional to think about that, now there's brands out there that exist where our kids can see themselves on a grand scale, right?

Jenn Harper:

And that was the vision and goal for Cheekbone Beauty from the beginning, like on a grand scale, indigenous youth will see themselves, our mission and vision to this day is helping every indigenous kid on the planet see, and feel their value in the world where we craft sustainable color cosmetics. And that has never changed, that's always been the purpose. And I'm just so proud of the past campaign. I feel so fortunate because of course it's something as a small brand, we could never afford to do that kind of grand scale media, but what a prize to win, what a win for our kids, what a win for our community and the feedback from that has been phenomenal.

Jenn Harper:

And even having, I think of our mission and vision always about indigenous youth, but it's just all of our people from fathers to women saying, “I had no idea how much I needed Cheekbone Beauty in my life to help me feel and see who I am, and where I come from.” And I'm in some days I feel super lucky that I get to wake up and this is my job. And I get to be a part of that big dream. And we still have so much more work to go, we're going to make sure those billboards are in America over the next year. And our partnership with Sephora USA will hopefully all come out at the end of 2022. We're still signing deals and contracts, but super excited to make sure that indigenous and native faces are across billboards in the United States as well.

Paul Gowder:

What I find incredible as I interview more people, whether it's TV actors, or singers or business people like yourself, is everybody talks about that growing up, they didn't see themselves in anything. And so they have this mission, this drive to fix this representation issue. And now I think about all the… With Rutherford Falls, we got a show on TV and Reservation Dogs. And now that people are seeing a billboard of not only a native owned and operated company, but making products for native people, what are we going to see from our native youth in five or 10 years, it's going to be amazing to really watch what these people can do now that they're seeing anything as possible. Yeah, it's pretty cool.

Paul Gowder:

I wanted to ask you, you mentioned a couple times your partnership with Sephora, going into that, how was that approaching a company, assuming they had not worked with any kind of indigenous people before, what kind of education and how did that go as far as having them understand where you were coming from as an indigenous company and those kind of principles?

Jenn Harper:

Yeah. It's been a really, really great journey. And specifically I can speak to working with Sephora Canada at this point, I've had our meetings with Sephora USA and they've also just been incredibly consultive. And I'm saying that because I'm traditionally not from the beauty industry. So as much as I think we're teaching the them, this is a wonderful, really reciprocal relationship, because they're teaching me and helping me understand their space, which I am fully and open and honest about that, I'm learning as I go. So I feel like it's been this really, really wonderful relationship. Trust me, we get heat sometimes, because they're a massive corporation, but let's face it. There's a lot of massive corporations, but there's a lot of really great people. And people is where change happens, that work for these massive corporations.

Jenn Harper:

And so the people that I've gotten to work with from Sephora Canada and Sephora USA have been absolutely incredible. And they feel, when they talk to us, they're like, “There's just something so special about your community and the brand you've created.” And they really see that and feel that. So I truly respect the help that they've given us. And I hope that we're helping them understand and learn about indigenous people and how complex and how, yes, we're similar, but there's so many tribes and nations and languages and lifestyles among our groups of people, that really we don't want to be put in that pan indigenous idea. I really want the world to understand how unique and interesting all of our tribes truly are.

Paul Gowder:

That's awesome. And I like what you said. I think it's so true that, because I've got relationship with some big corporations too and same kind of thing, I'll hear from people that, “Wow, why are you working with them?” But it is the people. And if there's even just one person in these corporations that realize that there is something they can gain from having a more diverse portfolio or including another perspective, it only takes one. And then who knows where it can grow from there. So that's awesome that you were able to get that. That's really cool.

Paul Gowder:

So one of the things I always like to ask people in your position is, so thinking back on that little girl, that's riding the Greyhound bus down that highway, What would you tell her now? And what kind of advice would you give her or other young women out there that are really trying to start their journey? Maybe not just in beauty but any kind of business, and they're trying to dream big, looking back, what would you tell them?

Jenn Harper:

Yeah, absolutely keep dreaming as big as you possibly can and heal fast and sooner. I feel like it's not over, the trauma and pain that exists for many of our nations because of past pain. And I think the faster that we can heal ourselves, the better human we become within our society and then the better person we become, which just helps us go out and do amazing and great things. So because of my personal story, I feel like being open and honest about healing is really, really important and removing any shame that comes with that because the moment we remove shame, it begins to die. And I felt like for me personally, the moment I spoke about the things that were causing me so much pain in my life, I was killing the shame, which helped me heal faster, even though it was a lot later in life, I wish it happened younger.

Jenn Harper:

So I really hope, wish that for our youth, if they are struggling in any way and it's our parents, our grandparents, we are not them and their mistakes are not ours. And even our own past mistakes, all of that can be fixed. Everything's figureoutable. And so don't give up on that dream and I think just make it bigger and bigger and bigger and work consistently every single day. I'm so honest about saying to people, “I have no special skills. I honestly do not.” I just woke up every day for the last five years and did something to work on Cheekbone Beauty, and to push the needle that little bit forward. And so I think consistency is really, really key in making something successful.

Paul Gowder:

Yeah. It takes a lot of per perseverance, but yeah, you put the work in and eventually you'll see the results. That's really, really motivating to think that way. That's awesome. So you got your partnership with Sephora, you guys are killing it online. I see it on Facebook or Instagram wherever, so where are we going now? What's the future look like for you guys?

Jenn Harper:

Yeah. So again, growing that Sephora relationship, our next big goal is the Clean + Planet Positive beauty shelf space in Sephora. We've created a brand that's unique within the beauty industry. And so we're really proud of the products. And so we want that shelf in Sephora, we are marking our territory that is going to be our land. We're taking that space up. And innovation has been a huge part of what we do.

Jenn Harper:

A lot of indie brands, which I'm going to make sure everyone… An indie brand is what they call a smaller brand in the beauty industry right now. So we are an indie brand, but what we did as a business, we made a big business decision about a year and a half ago to focus on in innovation. And the reason why is because I feel like that is one thing with innovation, we can change the world, and two it's what's going to separate us from what's going on in the spaces that we work in.

Jenn Harper:

And we built an indigenous innovation lab here at our headquarters, hired a full-time team of scientists. And so we're working on really cool projects. One right now is the land that we operated on Niagara region, it's the most gorgeous, beautiful fruit bearing land, wine country. And we're partnered with some local purveyors that we're taking their waste from the fruit industry and actually taking and pulling active ingredients from the waste and turning it into usable ingredients for our future products that we're working on in our lab right now.

Jenn Harper:

And so that whole idea of a circular economy where, what our people have done since the beginning of time was repurpose, reuse every part of everything. And so that's the direction we're taking the brand and the kind of ingredients we have and things that come from nature. They're literally so powerful in terms of like antioxidants and these things that are so great for our skin.

Jenn Harper:

And so the cosmetics that we've already made, we're really proud of the work we've done. We call it makeup, that skincare meaning it's actually, we spend, I say, as ladies and I know lots of gentlemen now too, spend a ton of money on skincare. And so why would you put inferior makeup products on your skin that you don't know where they're made in the world, you don't know what ingredients are sourced.

Jenn Harper:

So with our brand, we've made sure everything is done ethically and sustainably. We call it lifecycle thinking from harvesting the raw ingredient to the end of the life of the product. We can tell you every step along the way. And because we have our lab, we can tell you exactly where everything comes from and how things are sourced. And so we're really transparent with our customers and community that way. We don't outsource products where we don't know where the ingredients are coming from, which unfortunately the entire beauty industry mostly operates that way, but we've taken a purposeful direction to do things completely different and really have that idea of farm to face, which is in owe to my years in the food industry. Because it's what lots of chefs do. Right? You think about, you want to know where the ingredients for your meal have come from. Well, it's the same thing in with our cosmetic line, we want to know where all of the raw ingredients for our products have come from and how they're made.

Paul Gowder:

I love the term farm to face. I've not heard, that's awesome. The whole farm to table movement is getting so much buzz right now. That's really cool. Wow. And so many companies now you hear, big companies like Apple trying to be carbon neutral and they've built their new campus with their solar panels and all of this. It's like yeah, this is something that people have been doing in this area for centuries. But it is cool to see that you guys built that concept in from the beginning. Amazing. That's awesome.

Paul Gowder:

So, thanks again for taking some time to speak with us. Anything else you want people out there to know about Cheekbone? I will definitely put the links in and share it. We got a special code that we can offer some folks, but anything else you want to say, people that are checking out your brand?

Jenn Harper:

No. If anyone has any questions, we have a great team. If you need help picking out shades or colors, we actually have an in-house beauty expert, Paloma. She helps and guides our community that way. We're open and honest about so many things. So please ask questions. I feel like the consumer, there's so much information out there and we know we live in a world, sometimes there's a lot of misinformation, and then there's just marketing schemes or sort of that buzz words people throw out. So I feel like when we talk about clean vegan, sustainable beauty at the Cheekbone, we actually created our own standards. And so we call them biin beauty standards, which is the Anishinaabe word for clean, because we felt like we wanted to find who we were. So we're just really open. And if anyone from your community has questions for us, we're here to answer them.

Paul Gowder:

That's great. Well, thank you so much for your time. Can I wait to follow where you guys are going to go now. And hopefully we'll see you [inaudible 00:29:58] here in the state soon.

Jenn Harper:

Yes. Yes you will. I know you will.

Paul Gowder:

All right. What an incredible story. Thanks Jenn, for being on the show, don't forget to go check out Cheekbone Beauty over at www.cheekbonebeauty.com and use our special code to get 15% off with PowWows.com. That's code PowWows.com over at Cheekbone Beauty, and you'll get 15% off your order.

Paul Gowder:

All right. Ready for your bonus code? Head on over to www.PowWows.com/win and enter daily for the best chances to win one of those 10 Pendleton blankets. Today's bonus code is 88253 that's 88253. Just take that over to www.PowWows.com/win, and that will get you extra entries into the contest. And don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter, to get all of the updates about PowWows.com, upcoming Pow Wows, our live streams and more. www.PowWows.com/newsletter. And Hey, if you enjoyed the show, I'd really appreciate it. If you'd head over to Spotify or Apple Podcast and give us a review or a rating, and even more importantly, if you did like the show, share it with a friend, let's see if we can grow the show even more this year. I'd really appreciate your support.

Paul Gowder:

This show is brought to you by our patrons over at www.PowWownation.com. Those are the folks that are making monthly contributions to the community at PowWows.com. Their contributions are letting us produce podcasts like this and stream even more Pow Wows in 2022. If you'd like to join this them and help support powWos.com, please head on over to www.PowWownation.com. All right, everybody again, I'm Paul Gowder and I am the host and founder of PowWows.com, I will see you back next week. Stay safe and see you soon.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for listening to the Pow Wow Life Podcast from PowWows.com. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast, to get notified of our next episode. Find a Pow Wow near you by visiting www.PowWows.com/calendar. Support PowWows.com by visiting www.PowWownation.com.

 


 


Home » Blog » Native Entrepreneur Partners With Sephora – Jenn Harper – Founder Of Cheekbone Beauty


0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
2 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Milestone Apply

Congratulations! Jenn Harper is one of the confirmed speakers for the Return of Its Seventh-Annual Conference (The 2022 WNORTH Conference), Sponsored by SAP. In-person components will take place at Nita Lake Lodge, 500 feet from the base of Whistler Mountain and the Creekside Gondola, with virtual portions streaming on Bizzabo to attendees around the globe on Thursday, April 28.

LINDA BASS

CONGRATS JENN AND MUCH SUCESS!!

Free Email Series: What to Expect at Your First Pow Wow

PowWows.com