2 thoughts on “Dawes Roll Poster

  1. For many years my family has tried to find our Cherokee link, unfortunately, my grandfather would not pass any info on. He was afraid our family would be forced onto the Cherokee Rez, etc. Also, do you know anything about the Georgia Courthouse fire that destroyed all info related to the Dawes Roll numbers, etc? That is where our “trail” of Cherokee ancestors ends, but not our pride, which we continue to be proud to tell the world.

    I await your most precious answer.

    • Josiah Hair says:

      I have written several articles about the Dawes Roll, I assure you the Dawes Commission did not ever attempt to “force” anyone that was already living outside the boundaries of the Cherokee Nation back. As a matter of documented fact they did not allow anyone that was living outside the boundaries to be included on the roll. As for Courthouse Fire in Georgia… The Dawes Roll is a Federal Document which has been kept safe and sound in the Federal Archives of the US Government. Actually Numerous copies were penned at the time and all were completed approved and passed in 1914. The whole series of documents can be found in numerous places I personally use the website http://www.fold3.com. But you could go and view the original at the various Archives around the country I have personally seen the document in Ft Worth Texas. Here are a series of links.
      http://www.archives.gov/research/
      http://www.archives.gov/research/search/index.html
      http://www.archives.gov/research/native-americans/dawes/rolls-index.html
      http://www.archives.gov/atlanta/

      Here is some really good information regarding the National Archives and tracing Native American Ancestry.
      Step 5: What You Can Do Next
      If you did not find your ancestor in the Dawes Rolls online, but you feel sure they were in one of the “Five Civilized Tribes”, here are some ideas for where you can look further: Check in the microfilm of BIA records for those who applied for the Dawes Rolls, but who were rejected or stricken or judged doubtful for enrollment. This microfilm can be viewed or purchased from NARA’s Fort Worth facility. See Fort Worth’s microfilm listing.

      Contact the National Archives facility in Fort Worth, and request that they check the 1896 Dawes applications. Many who applied during the 1896 application process, which was later declared invalid, did not re-apply after the Dawes Commission started over in 1898. Fort Worth has these 1896 applications. To order a copy, you will need to provide Fort Worth with the person’s name and tribe.

      Contact the National Archives facility in Fort Worth at (817) 831-5620, and have them check their alphabetical indexes. The Final Rolls Index online here just includes those who were accepted by the Dawes Commission. Fort Worth has an index that includes everyone who applied.

      Check the 1900 Census, beginning with the Soundex index. This will tell you where your ancestor was living, and one’s race as Indian or white, etc. was designated. For those Indians living in predominantly Indian areas, there were special Indian schedules identifying one’s tribe and parents’ tribes.
      Note: The 1900 Census is not available on the NARA website, only the microfilm catalog is. For access to the census, you can visit any NARA facility or purchase the microfilm, go to the subscription-based Ancestry.com website (there’s free access to Ancestry in all NARA facilities), or check with your local library or genealogical society.

      Check the Guion Miller Rolls on microfilm roll M1104. These include 45,847 applications by Eastern Cherokees to share in an award granted by the U.S. Court of Claims on May 28, 1906. You can view the Guion Miller Rolls index online.

      Check the Census of Intruders. For example, the Cherokees compiled a list of intruders in 1893. See the listing of microfilm rolls pertaining to Non-Indians in Indian Territory available from NARA’s Fort Worth facility.

      See the page of links to Indian/Native American web sites, compiled by the National Archives librarians.

      See the Department of Interior’s How Do I Trace Indian Ancestry? page.

      Ask yourself why do you think your ancestor was Indian? Just because they may have lived in Indian Territory does not make them Indian. There were many non-Indians living in these areas.

      ——————————————————————————–

      If you found your ancestor online in the Dawes Rolls, you can:
      Continue Native American Research Online
      Find Tribal Membership information: Tribal Membership in the Cherokee Nation.
      Creek Nation
      Choctaw Tribal Membership
      Chickasaw Tribal Membership
      Seminole Nation of Oklahoma

      Review the following article in Prologue, The Journal of the National Archives
      Snakes & Scribes: The Dawes Commission and the Enrollment of the Creeks, part 1 and part 2, by Kent Carter, Spring 1997, Vol. 29, No. 1

      Check the Guion Miller Rolls on microfilm roll M1104. These include 45,847 applications by Eastern Cherokees to share in an award granted by the U.S. Court of Claims on May 28, 1906. You can view the Guion Miller Rolls index online.

      Read Kent Carter’s book, The Dawes Commission and the Allotment of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1893-1914. Publisher: Ancestry.com; (May 1, 1999). ISBN: 091648985X

      Search NARA’s Microfilm Catalog, American Indians: A Select Catalog of National Archives Microfilm Publications.

      See the list of holdings in the Fort Worth facility from the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

      See the list of Microfilm Rolls pertaining to Native Americans available at the National Archives at Fort Worth

      Read about Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940, which also lists Microfilm roll numbers, the jurisdiction, and dates.

      Link to other NARA web pages relating to Indian/Native American records at NARA

      Link to Indian/Native American web sites, compiled by the National Archives librarians.

      See the Department of Interior’s How Do I Trace Indian Ancestry? page.

      The Oklahoma Historical Society holds some federal records related to the Five Civilized Tribes, and their web site has info. on Native American research. (This is one of NARA’s Affiliated Archives.)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *