Chickasaw Nation Showcases Thriving Culture Online

By Toyacoyah Brown on May 15, 2014
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The Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma is proud of its heritage and hopes to increase awareness of their culture and legacy by producing high-quality videos for the public to view. Chickasaw.tv is where the Chickasaw Nation’s past and present come together. Take a look below at some of the talented members of this nation.

Jeremy Wallace is a Chickasaw drummer, singer and stomp dancer. During his performances, Jeremy’s connection to his ancestors and the Creator become palpable, as he honors his Chickasaw heritage through song and dance.

Margaret Roach Wheeler has known she wanted to be an artist since the first grade. Here she talks about how she approaches her craft, and the spiritual aspects of weaving.

We’ll be featuring more videos of the Chickasaws in the future so be sure to check back! In the mean time you can learn more about the Chickasaw Nation, their history and impactful present, by visiting Chickasaw.TV.

TOPICS: Blog, Craft Tutorials, Featured, Native American Culture, Native American History, Native American Music

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One Response to “Chickasaw Nation Showcases Thriving Culture Online”

  1. Brenda Hall says:

    Now that was something well worth watching, please do more of that kind of informing. Thank you.

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