native-ameican-tech

IF THEY HAVE HAD IT THEY WOULD HAVE USED IT – MAYBE?

17 responses

  1. Rebecca Hunt Locklear
    October 16, 2012

    Very nice! What an education! I learned a ton from this one Jamie. Wow! I had no idea about the beads and cloth. Thanks!!!!

    Reply

  2. Tammy Kinderman
    October 16, 2012

    Great Article! I learned a few things myself. Very well written.

    Reply

  3. June nix
    October 16, 2012

    Great writing Jamie, I always enjoy reading your article. They are informative and I always learn something new.

    Reply

  4. Tom Iron Eagle
    October 18, 2012

    Very nice Bro, learned something I never knew about the trade silver. Thanks bro!

    Reply

  5. Unagog
    October 19, 2012

    Until reading this story, I didn’t know what “German Silver” was. Great Article.

    Reply

  6. Sue Kuie
    October 19, 2012

    Very informative article, thanks for sharing Jamie!

    Reply

  7. Jason
    April 2, 2013

    Im curious about the many of the “facts” presented in this article. Nearly all examples of 18th century silverwork found in a Native context is actually pure silver. Tutanage/German Silver… was not introduced until much later.
    As to the patterns supposedly prefered, there are massive volumes of extant cloth which survive, as well as artwork, and written documents which would disagree with our claims. For a primer on what was really available in the 18th century, check out Florence Montgomery’s “Textiles in America”.

    Reply

  8. Jamie K Oxendine
    April 4, 2013

    And as I mentioned in the paragraphs on Trade Silver, German Silver as we know it was a 19th Century product – but the concept of what would be called German Silver before it was called German Silver did exist in Trade in America before the 19th Century. This metal known as Tutanage or Argentan or Nickel Silver was available in the 18th Century and was of use as a substitute for real silver. As known the German Metalworkers eventfully perfected the formula and thus its name became known as German Silver.

    As for the Trade Cloth yes we know there were massive volumes of cloth. The French alone had hundreds of warehouses full of just Trade Cloth and Trade Shirts for the Native Americans of the North East and Great Lakes as gifts and even bribes to get their “allegiance” so to speak. And that was just the warehouses of Trade Cloth as they had warehouses of other trade materials.

    The patterns preferred are only a small example of what was popular during the time. As said there were massive amounts of cloth and what was and what was not popular can also be subjective to the “fashion” of the day. A perfect example: 100 years from now even with the incredible documentation we have, there could still be a huge discussion on whether stripes or solids were the fashion of the day in 2013.

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  9. Laura
    November 7, 2013

    Wonderfully informative, Jamie! I’m glad to be learning from you before I get any farther along in my regalia.

    Reply

  10. Frank ( Tommy ) Elliott
    June 13, 2014

    Not to get off topic, but Becky & I really enjoyed ourselves at Ft. Ancient last week. It wa good to see you and am looking forward to seeing you again next year or later this year in Perrysburg.

    Reply

  11. Lee Slusher
    October 6, 2014

    It is great to see that the idea of Native Americans just taking whatever they could get from the Europeans is false.

    Reply

  12. NoahYork
    October 6, 2014

    I love how some people think that if a people live without certain goods and materials, they are too primitive to grasp ideas like quality versus quantity, or any of the other misperceptions of Native Americans. Certain cultures may have some advancements that others lacked, but the intelligence of man is universal.

    Reply

  13. Alvelia Farmer
    October 6, 2014

    Very informative and detailed. It does make me wonder what would Native American culture had been like if it wasn’t removed…

    Reply

  14. Mark Chase
    October 7, 2014

    I never knew the trading history of Native America was so complex! I found it especially interesting that the tribes so carefully distinguished the different types of silver from one another and only used what was thought to have the most value.

    Reply

  15. Douglas Spirit Bear Neely
    October 7, 2014

    Well it just proves the old adage about learning something new everyday. I always thought that German Silver was just a lesser grade of silver! Good article!!

    Reply

  16. Nate Zona
    October 7, 2014

    This is great! A wonderful source of information, which helps to clear up some misconceptions. Thank you for writing it!

    Reply

  17. Gary Jeffrey III
    October 8, 2014

    Like others stated above, I was completely unaware that there were so many hurdles to overcome in regards to trading for a lot of the Natives. Yet again another story to serve as an eye-opener for those who were here in North America before all of the settlers came crashing in.

    Reply

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